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The pesonage
January 2009
JACKSON POLLOCK
JACKSON POLLOCK
EARLY LIFE
Pollock was born in Cody, Wyoming in 1912, the youngest of five sons.[citation needed] His father was a farmer and later a land surveyor for the government. He grew up in Arizona and Chico, California, studying at Los Angeles' Manual Arts High School. During his early life, he experienced Native American culture while on surveying trips with his father. In 1930, following his brother Charles, he moved to New York City, where they both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League of New York. Benton's rural American subject matter shaped Pollock's work only fleetingly, but his rhythmic use of paint and his fierce independence were more lasting influences. From 1935 to 1943, Pollock worked for the WPA Federal Art Project.
THE SPRINGS PERIOD AND THE UNIQUE TECNIQUE
In October 1945, Pollock married another important American painter, Lee Krasner, and in November they moved to what is now known as the Pollock-Krasner House and Studio in Springs on Long Island, New York. Peggy Guggenheim loaned them the down payment for the wood-frame house with a nearby barn that Pollock made into a studio. It was there that he perfected the technique of working spontaneously with liquid paint. Pollock was introduced to the use of liquid paint in 1936, at an experimental workshop operated in New York City by the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros. He later used paint pouring as one of several techniques in canvases of the early 1940s, such as "Male and Female" and "Composition with Pouring I." After his move to Springs, he began painting with his canvases laid out on the studio floor, and developed what was later called his "drip" technique. The drip technique required paint with a fluid viscosity so Pollock turned to then new synthetic resin-based paints, called alkyd enamels. Pollock described this use of household paints, instead of artistĺs paints, as "a natural growth out of a need".He used hardened brushes, sticks and even basting syringes as paint applicators. Pollock's technique of pouring and dripping paint is thought to be one of the origins of the term action painting. With this technique, Pollock was able to achieve a more immediate means of creating art, the paint now literally flowing from his chosen tool onto the canvas. By defying the conventional way of painting on an upright surface, he added a new dimension, literally, by being able to view and apply paint to his canvases from all directions. In the process of making paintings in this way he moved away from figurative representation, and challenged the Western tradition of using easel and brush, as well as moving away from use only of the hand and wrist; as he used his whole body to paint. In 1956 Time magazine dubbed Pollock "Jack the Dripper" as a result of his unique painting style. Pollock observed Indian sandpainting demonstrations in the 1940s. Other influences on his dripping technique include the Mexican muralists and also Surrealist automatism. Pollock denied "the accident"; he usually had an idea of how he wanted a particular piece to appear. It was about the movement of his body, over which he had control, mixed with the viscous flow of paint, the force of gravity, and the way paint was absorbed into the canvas. The mix of the uncontrollable and the controllable. Flinging, dripping, pouring, spattering, he would energetically move around the canvas, almost as if in a dance, and would not stop until he saw what he wanted to see. Studies by Taylor, Micolich and Jonas have explored the nature of Pollock's technique and have determined that some of these works display the properties of mathematical fractals;and that the works become more fractal-like chronologically through Pollock's career. They even go on to speculate that on some level, Pollock may have been aware of the nature of chaotic motion, and was attempting to form what he perceived as a perfect representation of mathematical chaosŚmore than ten years before Chaos Theory itself was proposed. Other experts have pointed to the possibility that he (Pollock) could have simply been imitating popular theories of the time in order to give his paintings a depth not previously seen. In 1950 Hans Namuth, a young photographer, wanted to photograph and film Pollock at work. Pollock promised to start a new painting especially for the photographic session, but when Namuth arrived, Pollock apologized and told him the painting was finished. Namuth's comment upon entering the studio.
THE 1950s AND BEYOND
Pollock's most famous paintings were during the "drip period" between 1947 and 1950. He rocketed to popular status following an August 8, 1949 four-page spread in Life Magazine that asked, "Is he the greatest living painter in the United States?" At the peak of his fame, Pollock abruptly abandoned the drip style. Pollock's work after 1951 was darker in color, including a collection in black on unprimed canvases, followed by a return to color and he reintroduced figurative elements. During this period Pollock had moved to a more commercial gallery and there was great demand from collectors for new paintings. In response to this pressure, along with personal frustration, his alcoholism deepened.[citation needed]
FROM NAMING TO NUMBERING
Pollock wanted an end to the viewer's search for representational elements in his paintings, thus he abandoned naming them and started numbering them instead. Of this, Pollock commented: "...look passively and try to receive what the painting has to offer and not bring a subject matter or preconceived idea of what they are to be looking for." Pollock's wife, Lee Krasner, said Pollock "used to give his pictures conventional titles... but now he simply numbers them. Numbers are neutral. They make people look at a picture for what it is - pure painting."
DEATH
Pollock did not paint at all in 1955.After struggling with alcoholism his whole life, Pollock's career was cut short when he died in an alcohol-related, single car crash in his Oldsmobile convertible, less than a mile from his home in Springs, New York on August 11, 1956 (10 p.m.) at the age of 44. One of his passengers, Edith Metzger, died, while the other passenger, Pollock's girlfriend Ruth Kligman, survived. After his death, Pollock's wife, Lee Krasner, managed his estate and ensured that Pollock's reputation remained strong in spite of changing art-world trends. They are buried in Green River Cemetery in Springs with a large boulder marking his grave and a smaller one marking hers. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_Pollock)
JACKSON POLLOCK
JACKSON POLLOCK
News
23/04/2010
MARCO LODOLA A FIRENZE
Inaugura il 23 aprile la nuova mostra di Marco Lodola a Firenze

23/10/2009
JONATHAN GUAITAMACCHI al teatro del contagio di Milano
Le bellissime scenografie di Jonathan Guaitamcchi fanno da sfondo allo spettacolo teatrale dal Titolo "Alcina- il viaggio avventuroso di Guerrin Meschino nella'antro della Sibilla" Ins cena il 24 e 25 ottobre 2009 al Teatro del Contagio di Milano

12/03/2009
GUSTAVO ACEVES AL MUSEO DE CIUDAD DE QUERETARO
Inaugura il 12 marzo 2009 in Messico la mostra dedicata a Gustavo Aceves "Habeas Corpus" al Centro Educativo Y Cultural Manuel Goez Morin

10/03/2009
OUTLINE COLLANA CURATA DA GIOVANNI IOVANE E FILIPA RAMOS
Outline is a new collection of essays of critique of contemporary art. The series is dedicated to the characterization and the in-depth analysis of themes, patterns and images of the contemporary art world. Outline is curated by Giovanni Iovane and Filipa Ramos.

02/02/2009
LODOLAvsCUSTRONE "Sovraesposione"
Inaugura il 12 febbraio 2009 alla Galleria Mar& Partners Art Gallery di Torino con una performance musicale di Andy dei Bluvertigo

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THE PESONAGE
April 2009
LA REGIONE ABRUZZO
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